Information Technology

Technology is constantly changing, so how can you be sure your systems are up-to-date?  We can help you learn how to manage and use the technological tools you need to operate efficiently.  You'll also find easy and affordable ways to outsource your information technology needs, ensuring the security and optimal effectiveness of your systems.  Because let's face it ... unless you are in the IT business, you probably need some help.


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With the proper technology and implementation team, your company can realize dramatic productivity and profitability gains. NuWave Technology Partners' unique approach provides clients with a single point-of-contact for all their telephone and data needs, and covers the spectrum from servicing existing phone systems to complete new installations.

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Technology with a Touch of Gray: The Case for Upgrading

By Chad Paalman is Vice President, NuWave Technology Partners. From Focus on Small Business, SBAM’s member-only magazine.

Midway through 2010, you send an email using Office 2000 on a PC that proudly announces its compatibility with Windows XP, call your customers on a telephone system that’s older than your high school age children, and prefer to avoid thinking about the longevity of your office server.

Just when you convince yourself to hang on a bit longer, you get more bad news: Microsoft will no longer support Windows XP after April 2014 (at the ripe old age of 14).
To upgrade or not to upgrade? That is the question many business owners will wrestle with this year.

70 percent Move to 7

This year, Windows XP turns 10 years old, decidedly geriatric in the software world, and even seriously long in the tooth for durable goods such as household appliances.
Is it worth it to upgrade to Windows 7? Well, yes.

According to a survey conducted by Computer World earler this year, 67 percent of IT professionals declined to upgrade from Windows XP to Vista. Windows 7 is another story.
The new operating system loads quickly — especially compared to Vista — is more stable, removes intrusive user access control pop ups, improves on document sharing, and makes remote access to corporate networks far easier.

From the standpoint of IT support, the operating system streamlines user configuration management, delivers better device compatibility, supports legacy programs, and affords improved integration with Windows Server 2008. The same Computer World survey reported that 70 percent of IT managers plan to upgrade to Windows 7 within the next year.

Finally, the recent arrival of Office 2010 may seal the deal. For small businesses in particular, it may be especially cost effective to purchase hardware preloaded with Windows 7 and Microsoft Office 2010.

Cost Saving Convergence

For those on the fence about upgrading their telephone architecture, the key selling point comes down to the convergence of voice and data communications — commonly known as Unified Communications (UC) — that integrate voice, messaging, instant messages, conferencing and CRM systems.

By bringing together these services on a platform such as Microsoft Office Communications Server 2008 software, UC can significantly reduce travel, telecom and IT costs, leaving your business leaner, greener and more efficient.

For employees, UC integrates email inbox, voicemail, fax and IM platforms in a single environment, eliminating the redundancy of having separate tools, networks and support teams for each service. For customers, UC provides unparalleled access to key employees whether they’re in the office, working from home or on the road.

Beyond the added capabilities, implementing an IP based phone system can significantly reduce business phone service expenses, especially if you operate several offices or need to add phone lines.

Virtual Office, Virtual Servers

Since the purchase of your office server back in the halcyon days of the Bull Market, server technology has come a long way. Today’s servers are far more efficient in power usage and resource utilization, all because of a cutting edge technology: server virtualization.
Translation: Today’s server hardware supports multiple installations of server software, unlike old servers which can only support one installation. That means, a single server box can mimic several servers: each can host a variety of operating systems (Windows Servers, Linux, etc), Microsoft Exchange servers, SQL servers and Web hosting.

Since one server is doing the work of several servers, you will use less electricity to operate the server and keep

The Four Pillars of an Internet Presence: Pillars Three & Four

By Wendy Williams

In the first article of this series, “The Four Pillars of a Robust Internet Presence for Small Businesses,” printed in the November/December issue of Focus, we talked about the changeable content on your website being the ground zero for crafting the business message you wish to share and reviewed the strategy for putting this message out into the world within a different context by sharing links out via social media channels. In this article, we talk about the second two pillars: eNews programs and personal interaction.


Pillar #3

The eNews program. T his method of communicating with your audience can reinforce the outreach from the first two pillars, but add a level of permission-based and direct messaging into the mix. It can be the most powerful channel, if done with a few important strategies in mind.

Not everyone reads your blog, and not everyone subscribes to social media
The first thing businesses must accept is that no matter how much effort you put into blog posts and conversing with your audience on social media, much of what you have to say will slip through the cracks. People hunt and peck around the Web for information they want, and you are lucky if they manage to discover your site.  A good eNews program, however, has the ability to turn all this effort into a narrative, driving your audience to your website so that nothing really slips between the cracks. On top of that, is MEASURABLE.
So how does an eNews Program Work?

Once you decide how often it makes sense to send out an eNews program, the best plan is to populate it with content (articles and posts) you have already created on your blog. Thus, your eNews becomes an aggregated email that highlights everything you wish to share since you sent out the last eNews. So if you decide to include a blog post you wrote or want to share a conversation you had about a topic on Facebook, you simply include all the links in your eNews.  Everyone who receives your eNews has REQUESTED to receive it, which is a great reason to make sure you are sharing material they are going to be delighted to get in their inbox. One example of a service that can manage an eNews program is Constant Contact.  The metrics in the back end are great as they show you how many people clicked on which links, how many people “opt out” and don’t wish to hear from you anymore (this can be an important clue that you need to think about the eNews using the perspective of your audience a bit more), and even how many people forwarded the eNews or shared it via social media. It’s great data.

In most eNews programs, such as Constant Contact, there is also an option to attach a URL containing your newsletter in the eNews. This is an important option to consider as you can then copy the url into a site such as bit.ly (which also utilizes tracking information) and put this optimized link into a Twitter post and on FB for sharing. For example, one of client only has 200 subscribers, but they get over 350 page views of each eNews because of the sharing on Twitter and Facebook.

How often should a company send out an eNews?

This is an interesting question to consider. If you send it out too often, without something compelling at its core, your eNews can quickly be regarded as “junk.” The rule of thumb would be to send an eNews out as often as you have something important to say (from your customer’s perspective, not yours). For many businesses, I think it is safe to say that quarterly will work well. For a business that has a lot of scheduled events, perhaps monthly would work better. One client, a Fish Market, sends their eNews every Friday. It seems like overkill in theory, but it works because the primary mission of the eNews for this particular business is listing what perishable items are available

Hungry for Market Research? FREE Resources Abound

By Nicolette Warisse Sosulski, MLIS

(From Focus on Small Business, the Small Business Association of Michigan’s member-only magazine.)


As a prospective entrepreneur, or the owner of a small or growth-stage business, market research may be the last thing that your budget can cover at the moment. However the data that you seek may be the difference or the edge between you and success or failure. Since firms are trying to sell you market reports or mailing lists from the time you get your DBA (“doing business as…”), the question may boil down to whether or not the information that you want needs to be purchased. As a business librarian, I get dozens of requests of this nature, so I will share some of my top resources in business research, either those that are free on the Internet or often available onsite or remotely from libraries.

List Directories

Sometimes you need lists — people in a particular industry who could be customers or markets or suppliers or competitors, or people already in business in your fi eld. For this purpose, the tool I value most is a database called ReferenceUSA, published by InfoUSA. It contains directory information from every phone directory in the United States, but contains far more from other conduits of company executive information, company income, and financials. There is also a residential component, so if you know your ideal customer makes $75,000 to $100,000 per year and lives in a house in a neighborhood with a value range of $200,000 to $225,000, you can search for neighborhoods with that demographic.
Search results can be saved and downloaded into Excel so that you can further manipulate the data within. ReferenceUSA is a subscription source, purchased by libraries for access by their patrons in the library or remotely using their library cards. It is not cheap, so many libraries do not have it, but it is worth asking your library if yours has it, or perhaps making a road trip to a library that does. Ask your librarian what types of company directory sources the library owns.

Professional Associations

These can be a goldmine of information. You can identify them by Googling a particular industry sector with the word “association,” or you can find them in library sources like The Encyclopedia of Associations or association directories, both online or in print to which your library subscribes. You may not think you want to join anything, so why would this be useful? The members of an association are deeply invested in their sector of the American industry landscape. They may commission studies, reports being made available to their members, of trends in an industry such as the growth of the green cleaning sector market share in the household cleaners industry, reports that could cost a lot from a market analyst. They have newsletters or websites with membership lists. I have found specialty niche sales professionals for a manufacturing company this way. Lastly, as I tell my patrons, all of us want to keep cold foods cold. However, if I am an ice cream truck vendor, I need information about the kind of high performance mobile cold storage that is not going to be found in Consumer Reports. Ads and evaluations of this type of equipment will appear in a publication dedicated to this industry. You may decide to join the association or you may just look at their web page. You should feel free to contact associations to see what kinds of reports and studies they make available to their members.

Article Databases and the MeL Business and Jobs Gateway

You are lucky. You are in Michigan. The libraries of your state have banded together to purchase databases — collections of online articles from professional and industry journals — and have made them available to every possessor of a Michigan drivers license or Michiga

Texting Law is No LOL Matter Outlook Voice Access Comes to the Rescue

When Gov. Granholm signed the new Texting Bill into law during a live appearance on the Oprah Show on April 30, more than a few of us road warriors started looking for practical answers to staying legal.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the average American spends over 100 hours each way commuting to work every year, surely a fraction of the time most road warriors spend on the road. I have to admit, I have done my share of texting while driving.
What’s the safe bet? In my opinion, “Unified Messaging” may be the answer. On the server side, Unified Messaging (UM) delivers a complete suite of voicemail functionality, but Outlook Voice Access (OVA) may be the best part of the package. OVA allows users to interact with their e-mail, contacts, and calendaring information through any telephone or mobile phone.

Among the features in OVA:
  • Listen to new and saved e-mail and voicemail messages.
  • Forward, reply, save, and delete e-mail and voicemail messages.
  • Interact with your calendar.
  • Locate a person in the global address list or personal contacts.
  • Send a voice message to a person.

Voice Commands Keep You Hands-Free and Legal

The speech recognition technology in the Outlook Voice Access system lets you use voice commands to access your calendar and get meeting details, call the organizers, or send a message notifying attendees that you will be late. Then you can access your address book, find related messages from the sender, or call the senders directly. This system may be the best efficiency tool since the PDA. Another solution is the Cisco Unified Communications platform for small businesses, a complete package of hardware and software for integrating voice and email. Beyond integration with Microsoft’s technology, Cisco offers its own software packages to manage voice mail, email and calendaring, and even integrate your customer relationship management database.

On the leading edge for many small businesses is the concept of managed phone systems, which allows a company to outsource its phone service and system to a third-party provider. The Cisco system allows small businesses — restaurants, service intensive companies or those with disparate staff — to take advantage of the features of enterprise phone systems without the capital outlay.

Using a Virtual Private Network connection — essentially a secure, dedicated connection delivered over the Internet — managed phone service routes business calls and faxes to designated phone lines, and manages the storage and retrieval of messages. Employees can check any type of message from the same inbox — either the voicemail box, accessed from a phone, or the e-mail inbox, accessed from a computer.

Similarly, a growing number of IT companies are providing hosted (or cloud computer based) Exchange Servers that deliver similar functionality to Cisco’s managed phone systems. Keep in mind, those that currently offer Outlook Voice Access usually provide a streamlined feature set in keeping with Exchange Server 2007.

To get the system off the ground, your company will need to start with a systems analysis to understand your business needs as they relate to a newer phone system. Companies with older business phone systems may need to upgrade to take advantage of this new Outlook Voice Access technology. If your company currently uses Exchange 2007, you can take advantage of most of the Exchange 2010 features if your phone system can be integrated with the server.

If you think Outlook Voice Access will make you a more responsible road warrior or save you from one of those $100 tickets, we advise that you act now as the texting law took effect July 1.

Chad Paalman is Vice President, NuWave Technology Partners.
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