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Cardiac emergencies can happen anywhere to anyone. Is your workplace prepared?

If someone collapsed from sudden cardiac arrest in your workplace today, would you know what to do? Would your employees know how to increase a co-worker’s chance of survival? With each minute of elapsed time before defibrillation, the chances of survival diminish by approximately 10 percent.

The fact is, employers are required by OSHA Standard 29 CFR 1910.151 to have a person or persons adequately trained to render first aid for worksites that are not in or near proximity to an infirmary, clinic, or hospital.

Thankfully, The Red Cross has an Alliance with OSHA signed in 2005 to work together to help employers train employees. The Red Cross is the leading provider of Automated External Defibrillator (AED) training and services. For the cost of a laptop computer, a lifesaving AED could be installed at any facility. Businesses with AEDs and people trained to use them save lives when every second counts.

Customizable Training

The American Red Cross suggests that the first-aid program for a particular workplace be designed to reflect the known and anticipated risks of the specific work environment. Consultation with local emergency medical experts and providers of first-aid training is encouraged when developing a first-aid program. It’s also required that the program must comply with all applicable OSHA standards and regulations. In fact, OSHA requires certain employers to have CPR-trained rescuers on site.

Sudden cardiac arrest is a potential risk at all worksites, regardless of the type of work. Serious consideration should be given to establishing a workplace AED program. There are a few important factors to consider:
1. First-aid supplies must be available in adequate quantities and readily accessible.
2. First-aid training courses should include instruction in general and workplace hazard-specific knowledge and skills.
3. CPR training should incorporate AED training.
4. An AED should be available at the worksite.
5. First-aid training should be repeated periodically to maintain and update knowledge and skills.
6. Management commitment and worker involvement is vital in developing a strong workplace safety program.

You can schedule an authorized OSHA instructor to come to your workplace or hold the OSHA 10 or 30 course at your local chapter of the American Red Cross. The Red Cross can customize the OSHA 10 or OSHA 30 courses to meet your occupational needs, while covering all the required topics. The OSHA 10 and OSHA 30 courses have mandatory topics that will be covered in addition to elective course topics as needed or requested by the employer.

Whether you need to train two employees or 1000 employees, the Red Cross can help by providing quality safety training when and where you need it. Flexible service delivery methods will help you meet OSHA Guidelines and prepare your employees to save lives. For more information contact your local American Red Cross Chapter, www.redcross.org/where.

The author, Alison Bono,  is the American Red Cross Mid-Michigan Chapter Regional Director of Communications and Marketing. She can be contacted at abono@midmichiganredcross.org.

Posted on Wednesday, January 26, 2011 (Archive on Wednesday, February 02, 2011)
Posted by mrogers  Contributed by
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